Pruning trees is our specialty. Through the use of the most current and scientifically supported pruning methods, we aim to achieve the best long term well-being for your tree. By envisioning the tree as it will develop into its mature form, we prune to support proper structure and with an emphasis on the overall health of the tree.  We achieve a natural and balanced appearance by selectively removing branches, allowing the tree to reach its full potential without the need for topping and shaping. When trees appear to be oversized for their location it is due to the improper placement or species selection for that planting site. Please note that our company offers re-shaping services for trees that have been topped or shaped in the past.

There are numerous reasons to prune a tree which include: removing diseased, dead and dying branches such as those infected with black knot; removal of damaged limbs due to storms or other trauma; adhering to clearance requirements for pedestrians, vehicles, and structures; maintenance and aesthetics for maturing or matured trees; as well as restoration of tree structure to avoid limb failure during extreme weather conditions.

To help ensure optimal structure of a developed tree, it is best to begin the pruning process while a tree is young. By managing and directing a tree during its rapid growth years, the cuts required are significantly smaller and cause less stress to the tree than pruning the much larger branch ten years later. Pruning a tree in its youth reduces the number and size of wounds that would be required at a later stage in development. The maintenance of mature or maturing trees through pruning is also important to preserve health, stability, and appearance.

Many are misinformed regarding the times of year a tree can be pruned, assuming that this can only be completed during the trees active growth period. The dormant period for a tree is surprisingly an appropriate time to prune the majority of tree species. For example, elms can only be pruned during the winter months to prevent the spread of disease. The state of the ground, frozen or thawed, has little to no impact on the quality of pruning and the overall health of the tree.